background image

CHAPTER 5

Filters and filtrators

This chapter is based on my article [

30

].

This chapter is grouped in the following way:

First it goes a short introduction in pedagogical order (first less general

stuff and examples, last the most general stuff):

filters on a set;

filters on a meet-semilattice;

filters on a poset.

Then it goes the formal part.

5.1. Implication tuples

Definition

399

.

An

implications tuple

is a tuple (

P

1

, . . . , P

n

) such that

P

1

. . .

P

n

.

Obvious

400

.

(

P

1

, . . . , P

n

) is an implications tuple iff

P

i

P

j

for every

i < j

(where

i, j

∈ {

1

, . . . , n

}

).

The following is an example of a theorem using an implication tuple:

Example

401

.

The following is an implications tuple:

1

.

A

.

2

.

B

.

3

.

C

.

This example means just that

A

B

C

.

I prefer here a verbal description instead of symbolic implications

A

B

C

,

because

A

,

B

,

C

may be long English phrases and they may not fit into the formula

layout.

The main (intuitive) idea of the theorem is expressed by the implication

P

1

P

n

, the rest implications (

P

2

P

n

,

P

3

P

n

, ...) are purely technical, as they

express generalizations of the main idea.

For uniformity theorems in the section about filters and filtrators start with

the same

P

1

: “(

A

,

Z

) is a powerset filtrator.” (defined below) That means that the

main idea of the theorem is about powerset filtrators, the rest implications (like

P

2

P

n

,

P

3

P

n

, ...) are just technical generalizations.

5.2. Introduction to filters and filtrators

5.2.1. Filters on a set.

We sometimes want to define something resembling

an infinitely small (or infinitely big) set, for example the infinitely small interval

near 0 on the real line. Of course there is no such set, just like as there is no natural

number which is the difference 2

3. To overcome this shortcoming we introduce

whole numbers, and 2

3 becomes well defined. In the same way to consider things

which are like infinitely small (or infinitely big) sets we introduce

filters

.

An example of a filter is the infinitely small interval near 0 on the real line. To

come to infinitely small, we consider all intervals ]

;

[ for all

 >

0. This filter

68