background image

2.2. INTRO TO CATEGORY THEORY

34

Lemma

196

.

Let

f

,

g

,

h

be isomorphisms. Let

g

f

=

h

1

. The diagram at

the figure

1

is commutative, every cycle in the diagram is an identity.

f

h

1

h

g

1

f

1

g

Figure 1

Proof.

We will prove by induction that every cycle of the length

N

in the

diagram is an identity.

For cycles of length 2 it holds by definition of isomorphism.

For cycles of length 3 it holds by theorem

195

.

Consider a cycle of length above 3. It is easy to show that this cycle contains

a sub-cycle of length 3 or below. (Consider three first edges

a

e

0

b

e

1

c

e

2

d

of the

path, by pigeonhole principle we have that there are equal elements among

a

,

b

,

c

,

d

.) We can exclude the sub-cycle because it is identity. Thus we reduce to cycles

of lesser length. Applying math induction, we get that every cycle in the diagram

is an identity.

That the diagram is commutative follows from it (because for paths

σ

,

τ

we

have the paths

σ

τ

1

and

τ

σ

1

being identities).

Lemma

197

.

Let

f

,

g

,

h

,

t

be isomorphisms. Let

t

h

g

f

= 1

Src

f

. The

diagram at the figure

2

is commutative, every cycle in the diagram is an identity.

(0,0)

(0,1)

(1,0)

(1,1)

f

t

1

g

f

1

t

h

1

h

g

1

Figure 2

Proof.

Assign to every vertex (

i, j

) of the diagram morphism

W

(

i, j

) defined

by the table

1

.

It is easy to verify by induction that the morphism corresponding to every

path in the diagram starting at the vertex (0

,

0) and ending with a vertex (

x, y

) is

W

(

x, y

).

Thus the morphism corresponding to every cycle starting at the vertex (0

,

0) is

identity.

By symmetry, the morphism corresponding to every cycle is identity.