background image

5.39. EQUIVALENT FILTERS AND REBASE OF FILTERS

126

Obviously

A

∈ F

1

and

A

∈ F

2

.

So there exist two different

F ∈

K

such that

A

up

F

. Consequently

∃F ∈

K

\ {G}

:

A

up

F

that is

d

(

K

\ {G}

) = Ω.

Example

701

.

There exists a filter on a set which cannot be weakly partitioned

into ultrafilters.

Proof.

Consider cofinite filter Ω on any infinite set.

Suppose

K

is its weak partition into ultrafilters. Then

x

d

(

K

\ {

x

}

) for

some ultrafilter

x

K

.

We have

d

(

K

\ {

x

}

)

@

d

K

(otherwise

x

v

d

(

K

\ {

x

}

)) what is impossible

due the last lemma.

Corollary

702

.

There exists a filter on a set which cannot be strongly par-

titioned into ultrafilters.

5.37. Open problems about filters

Under which conditions

a

\

b

and

a

#

b

are complementive to

a

?

Generalize straight maps for arbitrary posets.

5.38. Further notation

Below to define funcoids and reloids we need a fixed powerset filtrator.

Let (

F

A,

T

A

) be an arbitrary but fixed powerset filtrator. This filtrator exists

by the theorem

462

.

I will call elements of

F

filter objects

.

For brevity we will denote lattice operations on

F

A

without indexes (for ex-

ample, take

d

S

=

d

F

A

S

for

S

PF

A

).

Note that above we also took operations on

T

A

without indexes (for example,

take

d

S

=

d

T

A

S

for

S

PT

A

).

Because we identify

T

A

with principal elements of

F

A

, the notation like

d

S

for

S

PT

A

would be inconsistent (it can mean both

d

T

A

S

or

d

F

A

S

). We

explicitly state that

d

S

in this case does

not

mean

d

F

A

S

.

For

X ∈

F

we will denote GR

X

the corresponding filter on

P

A

. It is a con-

venient notation to describe relations between filters and sets, consider for example

the formula:

{

x

} ⊆

T

GR

X

.

We will denote lattice operations without pointing a specific set like

d

F

S

=

d

F

(

A

)

S

for a set

S

PF

(

A

).

5.39. Equivalent filters and rebase of filters

Throughout this section we will assume that

Z

is a lattice.

An important example:

Z

is the lattice of all small (regarding some

Grothendieck universe) sets. (This

Z

is not a powerset, and even not a complete

lattice.)

Throughout this section I will use the word

filter

to denote a filter on a sub-

lattice

DA

where

A

Z

(if not told explicitly to be a filter on some other set).

The following is an embedding from filters

A

on a lattice

DA

into the lattice

of filters on

Z

:

S

A

=

n

K

Z

X

∈A

:

X

v

K

o

.

Proposition

703

.

Values of this embedding are filters on the lattice

Z

.

Proof.

That

S

A

is an upper set is obvious.

Let

P, Q

S

A

. Then

P, Q

Z

and there is an

X

∈ A

such that

X

v

P

and

Y

∈ A

such that

Y

v

Q

. So

X

u

Y

∈ A

and

P

u

Q

w

X

u

Y

∈ A

, so

P

u

Q

S

A

.