background image

In fact funcoids are a generalization of topological spaces, so the well known theory of topolog-

ical spaces is a special case of the below presented theory of funcoids.

But probably the most important reason to study funcoids is that funcoids are a generalization

of proximity spaces (see section

2.2

for the denition of proximity spaces). Before this work it was

written that the theory of proximity spaces was an example of a stalled research, almost nothing
interesting was discovered about this theory. It was so because the proper way to research proximity
spaces is to research their generalization, funcoids. And so it was stalled until discovery of funcoids.
That generalized theory of proximity spaces will bring us yet many interesting results.

In addition to

funcoids

I research

reloids

. Using below dened terminology it may be said that

reloids are (basically) lters on Cartesian product of sets, and this is a special case of uniform
spaces. We don't need to dene uniform spaces in this work, it is enough for the reader just to
know that uniform spaces are certain lters on direct product of sets.

Afterward we study some generalizations.
Somebody might ask, why to study it? My approach relates to traditional general topology like

complex numbers to real numbers theory. Be sure this will nd applications.

This book has a deciency: It does not properly relate my theory with previous research in

general topology and does not consider deeper category theory properties. It is however OK for
now, as I am going to do this study in later volumes (continuation of this book).

Many proofs in this book may seem too easy and thus this theory not sophisticated enough.

But it is largely a result of a well structured digraph of proofs, where more dicult results are
made easy by reducing them to easier lemmas and propositions.

1.5 Earlier works

Some mathematicians were researching generalizations of proximities and uniformities before me
but they have failed to reach the right degree of generalization which is presented in this work
allowing to represent properties of spaces with algebraic (or categorical) formulas.

Proximity structures were introduced by Smirnov in [

11

].

Some references to predecessors:

In [

14

][

15

][

24

][

2

][

33

generalized uniformities and proximities are studied.

Proximities and uniformities are also studied in [

21

][

22

][

32

][

34

][

35

].

[

19

and [

20

contains recent progress in quasi-uniform spaces. [

20

has a very long list of

related literature.

Some works ([

31

]) about proximity spaces consider relationships of proximities and compact topo-

logical spaces. In this work the attempt to dene or research their generalization, compactness of
funcoids or reloids is not done. It seems potentially productive to attempt to borrow the denitions
and procedures from the above mentioned works. I hope to do this study in a separate volume.

[

10

studies mappings between proximity structures. (In this volume no attempt to research

mappings between funcoids is done.) [

25

researches relationships of quasi-uniform spaces and

topological spaces. [

1

studies how proximity structures can be treated as uniform structures and

compactication regarding proximity and uniform spaces.

This book is based partially on my articles [

29

][

27

][

28

].

[TODO: Add more references to my

articles.]

In [

29

I introduced the concept of

lter objects

. This was probably not a very good idea. In this

work I instead use plain lters (not lter objects) and

t

and

u

notation for joins and meets instead

of

[

and

\

, which may be confused with set theoretic operations, for lattices in consideration (and

for the lattice of lters the order is reverse to the set theoretic inclusion). Also this work diers
from [

29

in using in some formulations the lattice of principal lters which is isomorphic to the

base poset instead of using the base poset itself (what was possible in [

29

thanks to using lter

objects). I've replaced

(

F

;

A

)

notation for primary ltrators with

(

F

;

Z

)

for consistency of notation

among sections.

12

Introduction