background image

That state is not good.

3 The rationale and examples

In mathematics it is often encountered that a small set

S

naturally bijectively corresponds to a

subset

R

of a larger set

B

. (In other words, there is specified an injection

E

from

S

to

B

.) It is a

widespread practice to equate

S

with

R

.

Remark 1.

I denote the first set

S

from the first letter of the word “small” and the second set

B

from the first letter of the word “big”, because

S

is intuitively considered as smaller than

B

.

(However we do not require card

S <

card

B

.) I denote the injection as

E

from the first letter of

the word “embed” because it embeds the set

S

to the set

B

.

The set

B

is considered as a generalization of the set

S

, for example: whole numbers generalizing

natural numbers, rational numbers generalizing whole numbers, real numbers generalizing rational
numbers, complex numbers generalizing real numbers, etc.

Through these examples we see that

B

can be considered a generalization of

S

.

But strictly speaking this equating may contradict to the axioms of ZF/ZFC because we are

not insured against

S

B

incidents. Not wonderful, as it is often labeled as “without proof”.

To work around of this (and formulate things exactly what could benefit computer proof

assistants) we will replace the set

B

with a new set

B

having a bijection

M

:

B

B

such that

M

E

=

id

S

. (I call this bijection

M

from the first letter of the word “move” which signifies the

move from the old set

B

to a new set

B

).

4 Generalization situation

Now to the formalistic: I will call a

generalization situation

sets

S

and

B

together with an injection

E

from

S

to

B

. I will call, given a generalization situation, an

arbitrary generalization

a set

B

and a bijection

M

:

B

B

such that

M

E

=

id

S

.

For every generalization situation I will denote

R

=

im

E

.

Proposition 2.

For every arbitrary generalization:

1.

S

B

.

2.

E

is a bijection from

S

to

R

.

3.

E

=

M

1

|

S

.

Proof.

1.

S

=

im

(

id

S

) =

im

(

M

E

)

im

M

=

B

.

2. Obvious.

3.

M

E

=

id

S

M

1

M

E

=

M

1

id

S

E

=

M

1

|

S

.

Assuming axiom of foundation (one of the axioms of ZF, also known as

axiom of regularity

) I will

prove that an arbitrary generalization always exist for every generalization situation. Specifically
I will prove that

ZF generalization

(see below) is an arbitrary generalization.

In absence of the axiom of foundation one could reasonably assert existence of a bijection

M

:

B

B

such that

M

E

=

id

S

as an axiom. (Let’s call it

the axiom of generalization

.) This axiom

does not contradict to ZF because it is a consequence of the axiom of foundation.

5 ZF generalization

Let

S

and

B

are sets. Let

E

is an injection from

S

to

B

. (So we have a generalization situation.)

Let

R

=

im

E

.

2

Section 5