background image

We need to prove that these are really categories, that is that composition

of monovalued (entirely defined, injective, surjective) morphisms is monovalued
(entirely defined, injective, surjective) and that identity morphisms are mono-
valued, entirely defined, injective, and surjective.

Proof

We will prove only for monovalued morphisms and entirely defined

morphisms, as injective and surjective morphisms are their duals.

Monovalued

Let

f

and

g

are monovalued morphisms, Dst

f

= Src

g

. (

g

f

)

(

g

f

)

=

g

f

f

g

g

1

Dst

f

g

=

g

1

Src

g

g

=

g

g

1

Dst

g

=

1

Dst(

g

f

)

. So

g

f

is monovalued.

That identity morphisms are monovalued follows from the following: 1

A

(1

A

)

= 1

A

1

A

= 1

A

= 1

Dst 1

A

1

Dst 1

A

.

Entirely defined

Let

f

and

g

are entirely defined morphisms, Dst

f

= Src

g

.

(

g

f

)

(

g

f

) =

f

g

g

f

f

1

Src

g

f

=

f

1

Dst

f

f

=

f

f

1

Src

f

= 1

Src(

g

f

)

. So

g

f

is entirely defined.

That identity morphisms are entirely defined follows from the following:
(1

A

)

1

A

= 1

A

1

A

= 1

A

= 1

Src 1

A

1

Src 1

A

.

Definition 14

I will call a

bijective

morphism a morphism which is entirely

defined, monovalued, injective, and surjective.

Obvious 3.

Bijective morphisms form a full subcategory.

Proposition 3

If a morphism is bijective then it is an isomorphism.

Proof

Let

f

is bijective. Then

f

f

1

Dst

f

,

f

f

1

Src

f

,

f

f

1

Src

f

,

f

f

1

Dst

f

. Thus

f

f

= 1

Dst

f

and

f

f

= 1

Src

f

that is

f

is an inverse

of

f

.

3

Funcoids

3.1

Informal introduction into funcoids

Funcoids are a generalization of proximity spaces and a generalization of pre-
topological spaces. Also funcoids are a generalization of binary relations.

That funcoids are a common generalization of “spaces” (proximity spaces,

(pre)topological spaces) and binary relations (including monovalued functions)
makes them smart for describing properties of functions in regard of spaces. For
example the statement “

f

is a continuous function from a space

µ

to a space

ν

” can be described in terms of funcoids as the formula

f

µ

ν

f

(see below

for details).

Most naturally funcoids appear as a generalization of proximity spaces.

8