background image

Suppose

Z

6

=

Z

∈ P

N

. Without loss of generality we may assume that some

b

Z

but

b

6∈

Z

. Then

M

(

Z

)

up

F

b

and

N

\

M

(

Z

)

up

F

b

. If

M

(

Z

) =

M

(

Z

) then

F

b

=

what contradicts to the above.

So

M

is an injective function from

P

R

to

P

N

what is impossible due cardi-

nality issues.

Appendix B. Logic of Generalizations

In mathematics it is often encountered that a smaller set

S

naturally bijec-

tively corresponds to a subset

R

of a larger set

B

. (In other words, there is

specified an injection from

S

to

B

.) It is a widespread practice to equate

S

with

R

.

Remark 14

I denote the first set

S

from the first letter of the word “small” and

the second set

B

from the first letter of the word “big”, because

S

is intuitively

considered as smaller than

B

. (However we do not require card

S <

card

B

.)

The set

B

is considered as a generalization of the set

S

, for example: whole

numbers generalizing natural numbers, rational numbers generalizing whole
numbers, real numbers generalizing rational numbers, complex numbers gen-
eralizing real numbers, etc.

But strictly speaking this equating may contradict to the axioms of ZF/ZFC

because we are not insured against

S

B

6

=

incidents. Not wonderful, as it is

often labeled as “without proof”.

To work around of this (and formulate things exactly what could benefit

computer proof assistants) we will replace the set

B

with a new set

B

having a

bijection

M

:

B

B

such that

S

B

. (I call this bijection

M

from the first

letter of the word “move” which signifies the move from the old set

B

to a new

set

B

).

Appendix B.1. The formalistic

Let

S

and

B

be sets. Let

E

be an injection from

S

to

B

. Let

R

= im

E

.

Let

t

=

P

S S

S

.

Let

M

(

x

) =

E

1

x

if

x

R

;

(

t

;

x

)

if

x

6∈

R.

Recall that in standard ZF (

t

;

x

) =

{{

t

}

,

{

t, x

}}

by definition.

Theorem 74

(

t

;

x

)

6∈

S

.

Proof

Suppose (

t

;

x

)

S

. Then

{{

t

}

,

{

t, x

}} ∈

S

. Consequently

{

t

} ∈

S

S

;

{

t

} ⊆

S S

S

;

{

t

} ∈ P

S S

S

;

{

t

} ∈

t

what contradicts to the axiom of

foundation (aka axiom of regularity).

Definition 79

Let

B

= im

M

.

59