background image

(3)

(2)

Let

X, Y

A

: (

X, Y

F

X

Y

F

)

.

Then

X, Y

F

:

X

Y

F

. Let

X

F

and

X

Y

A

. Then

X

Y

=

X

F

. Consequently

X, Y

F

. So

F

is an upper set.

Proposition 20

Let

A

be a meet-semilattice. Let

S

be a filter base. If

A

0

, . . . , A

n

S

(

n

N

)

, then

C

S

:

C

A

0

...

A

n

.

Proof

It can be easily proved by induction.

Proposition 21

If

A

is a meet-semilattice and

S

is a filter base,

A

A

, then

h

A

∩i

S

is also a filter base.

Proof

h

A

∩i

S

6

=

because

S

6

=

.

Let

X, Y

∈ h

A

∩i

S

. Then

X

=

A

X

and

Y

=

A

Y

where

X

, Y

S

.

Exists

Z

S

such that

Z

X

Y

. So

X

Y

=

A

X

Y

A

Z

∈ h

A

∩i

S

.

5.3. Characterization of finitely meet-closed filtrators

Theorem 29

The following are equivalent for a filtrator

(

A

;

Z

)

whose core is a

meet-semilattice such that

a

A

: up

a

6

=

:

1. The filtrator is finitely meet-closed.

2.

up

a

is a filter on

Z

for every

a

A

.

Proof

(1)

(2)

Let

X, Y

up

a

. Then

X

Z

Y

=

X

A

Y

a

. That up

a

is an upper

set is obvious. So taking in account that up

a

6

=

, up

a

is a filter.

(2)

(1)

It is enough to prove that

a

A, B

a

A

Z

B

for every

A, B

A

.

Really:

a

A, B

A, B

up

a

A

Z

B

up

a

a

A

Z

B.

6. Filter objects

I want to equate principal filters (see below) with the elements of the base

poset. Such thing can be done using the principles described in the appendix
Appendix B. The formal definitions follow.

24