background image

4 Rudin-Keisler equivalence and Rudin-Keisler order

Theorem 75.

Atomic filter objects

a

and

b

(with possibly different bases) are isomorphic iff

a

>

b

b

>

a

.

Proof.

Let

a

>

b

b

>

a

. Then there are a monovalued trans-reloids

f

and

g

such that dom

f

=

a

and im

f

=

b

and dom

g

=

b

and im

g

=

a

. Thus

g

f

is a monovalued morphism from

a

to

b

. By

the above we have

g

f

=

I

a

R LD

so

g

=

f

1

and

f

1

f

=

I

a

R LD

so

g

is monovalued. Thus

f

is an

injective monovalued trans-reloid from

a

to

b

and thus

a

and

b

are isomorphic.

The last theorem cannot be generalized from atomic f.o. to arbitrary f.o., as it’s shown by the

following two examples:

Example 76.

A

>

1

B ∧ B

>

1

A

but

A

is not isomorphic to

B

for some f.o.

A

and

B

.

Proof.

Consider

A

= [0; 1]

and

B

=

T

F

{

[0; 1 +

ε

)

|

ε >

0

}

. Then the function

f

=

{

(

x

;

x

/2)

|

x

R

}

witnesses both inequalities

A

>

1

B

and

B

>

1

A

. But these filters cannot be isomorphic because only

one of them is principal.

Lemma 77.

Let a function is defined as

f

(

x

;

y

) = (

f

0

x

;

f

1

y

)

. Then

h

f

i A ×

R LD

B

=

(

f

0

A

)

×

R LD

(

f

1

B

)

.

Proof.

h

f

i A ×

R LD

B

=

h

f

i

T

R LD

{

A

×

B

|

A

up

A

, B

up

B }

=

T

R LD

{h

f

i

(

A

×

B

)

|

A

up

A

,

B

up

B }

=

T

R LD

{h

f

0

i

A

× h

f

1

i

B

|

A

up

A

, B

up

B }

=

(theorem 148 in [4])

=

T

F

{h

f

0

i

A

|

A

up

A} ×

R LD

T

F

{h

f

1

i

B

|

A

up

B }

= (

f

0

A

)

×

R LD

(

f

1

B

)

.

Lemma 78.

If an f.o.

A

is isomorphic to an f.o.

B

then if

X

is a set and

X

F

A

is an atomic

f.o., then there exists a set

Y

such that

X

F

A

is an atomic f.o. isomorphic to

Y

F

B

.

Proof.

Let

A

is isomorphic to

B

. Then there are sets

A

,

B

such that

A ÷

A

is directly isomorphic

to

B ÷

B

. So there are a bijection

f

:

P

A

up

A →

P

B

up

B

such that

B

=

h

f

iA

.

up

X

F

A

=

up

(

X

A

)

F

A

=

h

X

A

∩ i

up

A

=

h

X

∩ i

(

P

A

up

A

)

Thus

hh

f

ii

up

X

F

A

=

h

f

(

X

)

∩ ihh

f

ii

(

P

A

up

A

) =

h

f

(

X

)

∩ i

(

P

B

up

B

) =

h

f

(

X

)

B

i

up

B

=

h

f

(

X

)

∩ i

up

B

=

up

f

(

X

)

F

B

.

So

h

f

i

X

F

A

=

T

F

hh

f

ii

up

X

F

A

=

T

F

up

f

(

X

)

F

B

=

f

(

X

)

F

B

.

Finally we have

f

(

X

)

F

B

is isomorphic to

X

F

A

from the last equality.

Example 79.

A

>

2

B ∧ B

>

2

A

but

A

is not isomorphic to

B

for some f.o.

A

and

B

.

Proof.

(proof idea by Andreas Blass, rewritten by me)

Let

u

n

,

h

n

with

n

ranging over the set

Z

are sequences of atomic f.o. and functions such that

h

h

n

i

u

n

+1

=

u

n

and

u

n

are pairwise non-isomorphic. (See [1] for a proof that such ultrafilters and

functions exist.)

A

=

def

S

R LD

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

+1

|

n

Z

 

;

B

=

def

S

R LD

{

n

} ×

RL D

u

2

n

|

n

Z

 

.

Let the functions

f , g

:

Z

×

N

Z

×

N

are defined by the formulas

f

(

n

;

x

) = (

n

;

h

2

n

x

)

and

g

(

n

;

x

) = (

n

1;

h

2

n

1

x

)

.

Using the fact that every function is a complete funcoid and a lemma above we get:

h

f

iA

=

S

R LD

h

f

i

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

+1

|

n

Z

 

=

S

R LD

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

|

n

Z

 

=

B

.

h

g

iB

=

S

R LD

h

g

i

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

|

n

Z

 

=

S

RL D

{

n

1

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

1

|

n

Z

 

=

S

R LD

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

+1

|

n

Z

 

=

A

.

It remains to show that

A

and

B

are not isomorphic.

Let

X

up

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

+1

for some

n

Z

. Then if

X

F

A

is an atomic f.o. we have

X

F

A

=

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

+1

and thus is isomorphic to

u

2

n

+1

.

If

X

up

{

n

} ×

R LD

u

2

n

+1

for every

n

Z

then

(

Z

×

N

)

\

X

up

{

n

} ×

RL D

u

2

n

+1

and thus

(

Z

×

N

)

\

X

up

A

and thus

X

F

A

=

.

Rudin-Keisler equivalence and Rudin-Keisler order

13