background image

Since

A

µ

we have

B

0

µ

or

B

1

µ

.

So either

B

0

∩ h

f

i

B

0

B

2

or

B

1

∩ h

f

i

B

1

B

2

. As such by the lemma 64 we have

B

2

µ

.

[TODO:

Clarify.]

This is incompatible with

B

2

∩ h

f

i

B

2

=

. So we got a contradiction.

Let

C

be the set of points

x

which are not periodic but

f

n

(

x

)

is periodic for some positive

n

.

Lemma 69.

C

µ

.

Proof.

Let

β

be a function

C

N

such that

β

(

x

)

is the least

n

N

such that

f

n

(

x

)

is periodic.

Let

C

0

=

{

x

C

|

β

(

x

)

is even

}

and

C

1

=

{

x

C

|

β

(

x

)

is odd

}

.

Obviously

C

j

∩ h

f

i

C

j

=

for

j

= 0

,

1

. Hence by the lemma 64 we have

C

0

, C

1

µ

and thus

C

=

C

0

C

1

µ

.

Let

E

be the set of

x

I

such that for no

n

N

we have

f

n

(

x

)

periodic.

Lemma 70.

Let

x, y

E

are such that

f

i

(

x

) =

f

j

(

y

)

and

f

i

(

x

) =

f

j

(

y

)

for some

i, j , i

, j

N

.

Then

i

j

=

i

j

.

Proof.

i

f

i

(

x

)

is a bijection.

So

y

=

f

i

j

(

y

)

and

y

=

f

i

j

(

y

)

. Thus

f

i

j

(

y

) =

f

i

j

(

y

)

and so

i

j

=

i

j

.

Lemma 71.

E

µ

.

Proof.

Let

D

E

be a subset of

E

with exactly one element from each equivalence class of the

relation

on

E

.

Define the function

γ

:

E

Z

as follows. Let

x

E

. Let

y

be the unique element of

D

such that

x

y

. Choose

i, j

N

such that

f

i

(

y

) =

f

j

(

x

)

. Let

γ

(

x

) =

i

j

. By the last lemma,

γ

is well-defined.

It is clear that if

x

E

then

f

(

x

)

E

and moreover

γ

(

f

(

x

)) =

γ

(

x

) + 1

.

Let

E

0

=

{

x

E

|

γ

(

x

)

is even

}

and

E

1

=

{

x

E

|

γ

(

x

)

is odd

}

.

We have

E

0

∩ h

f

i

E

0

=

µ

and hence

E

0

µ

.

Similarly

E

1

µ

.

Thus

E

=

E

0

E

1

µ

.

Lemma 72.

f

is the identity function on a set in

µ

.

Proof.

We have shown

A, C , E

µ

. But the points which lie in none of these sets are exactly

points periodic with period

1

that is fixed points of

f

. Thus the set of fixed points of

f

belongs

to the filter

µ

.

3.1.2 The main theorem and its consequences

Theorem 73.

For every atomic filter object

a

the morphism

((=)

|

a

;

a

;

a

)

is the only

1. monovalued morphism of the category of reloids from

a

to

a

;

2. injective morphism of the category of reloids from

a

to

a

;

3. bijective morphism of the category of reloids from

a

to

a

.

Proof.

We will prove only (1) because the rest follow from it.

Let

f

is a monovalued morphism from

a

to

a

. Then it exists a function

F

such that

F

up

f

.

Trivially

h

F

i

a

a

and thus

h

F

i

A

up

a

for every

A

up

a

. Thus by the lemma we have that

F

is

the identity function on a set in up

a

and so obviously

f

is an identity.

Corollary 74.

For every two atomic filter objects (with possibly different bases)

A

and

B

there

exists at most one bijective trans-reloid from

A

to

B

.

Proof.

Suppose that

f

and

g

are two different bijective trans-reloids from

A

to

B

. Then

g

1

f

is not the identity reloid (otherwise

g

1

f

=

I

dom

f

R LD

and so

f

=

g

). But

g

1

f

is a bijective trans-

reloid (as a composition of bijective reloids) from

A

to

A

what is impossible.

12

Section 3