background image

Circuitoids, a Generalization of Categories

by Victor Porton

The attempt presented in this article to generalize several directions in my research

was to cumbersome. It appears that it’s better to consider every case individually
without this generalization. This article is a blind valley in research. I don’t suggest
to read the below.

This article is not to be published, because the author is not an expert in category theory. But

it may be used as a part of my future writings on the topic of general topology.

1 Circuitoids

Consider the following Venn diagram:

On this diagram the set (of the cardinality four) of arguments (denoted as

X

and

Y

) of binary

relations

f

and

g

(denoted as circles) is split into the collection

G

of three sets (let’s call them

edges

1

) denoted by the dashed lines.

I will call a

proposed solution

assigning every edge a value. I will call a

solution

a proposed

solution such that its values are related by the binary relations whose arguments belong to the
edges.

The set of values assigned to the argument

X

of

f

and the argument

Y

of

g

such that there

exists a solution containing these values is essentially the composition

g

f

of binary relations

f

and

g

.

Thus we have expressed a composition of binary relations in the form of Venn diagrams.
Now let move on to a definition of composition of arbitrary (having an arbitrary, possibly

infinite, number of arguments) relations in term of Venn diagrams.

Remark 1.

Let

F

is a family of relations. Imagine that every relation

F

i

is an electronic component

with card dom

F

i

contacts. The partition

G

specifies which contacts are connected together. The

set

Z

denotes a set of “external” contacts which we measure. This results in a new relation (I call it

graph-composition

) of card

Z

arguments. See a formal definition of this (

the circuitoid of relations

)

below.

We will first do it in a more abstract way, using “morphisms” defined below (instead of relations)

having an arbitrary number of arguments.

Now we will formalize something similar to a category but each morphism having an arbitrary

(possibly infinite) number of arguments, instead of two arguments of a morphism of a category.

Definition 2.

An argumentoid is:

1. a small set

Hom

(the set of morphisms);

2. a small set

Arg

f

(set of arguments) for every

f

Hom

;

1. The term

edge

is from hypergraph theory.

1