background image

2. SPECIAL POINTS

76

(a)

Three surface sides

(b)

Two surface sides

Figure 1.

Examples of surface cardinality

FiXme

: Try to replace isomorphism

f

with some kind of filter embedding.

Consider the dihedral angle

T

produced by two half-planes. Are the points of

intersection of the half-planes isomorphism-special? (They should not be considered
special. If they are special, this is a probably flaw in the definition of isomorphism
special.)

Consider union

T

of two intersecting lines on a plane. The intersection may be

considered as a special point, because it has more connected components that the
rest. We don’t want to consider it special, however. We can restrict to consider
special only points which have less connected components (rather than more) to
correct this trouble. Also try to define it with some kind of morphisms of filters
instead of isomorphism as in isomorphism-special.

Exercise

2433

.

Excluding special points (either cardinality or isomorphism)

from closed disk produces open disk.

Let us note that special points of closed disk have surface cardinality 1 which

is less than surface cardinality (2) of regular points. So, it is a conceivable idea to
consider special points which have lesser surface cardinality than nearby points.

Consider the following two subsets of a plane (the lines are the set

T

, the small

black blob is the point

a

, and the cyan blob symbolizes the filter (

h

µ

i

{

a

}

)

\

T

):

For one of the sets surface cardinality of

a

is 3 and for another it is 2.

Now define

shift special points

.

Let

I

be an interval on

R

(containing zero?)

A point

a

is

shift special

if there exists a transformation (that is a continuous

function

f

:

I

×

µ

µ

such that:

1

.

f

(0) is identity.

FiXme

: Is this condition needed?

2

. for every sufficiently small

 >

0 we have

f

(

, a

)

T

;

3

. there is

 >

0 such that for every 0

0

we have

f

(

0

) being not

continuous at

a

regarding complete funcoid defined by the function

x

7→

h

µ

i

{

x

} \

T

.

We may consider to additonally require that every

f

(

) is isomorphism of fun-

coids.

Example

2434

.

T

is disk

n

(

x,y,

0)

x

2

+

y

2

1

o

.

f

is the contraction (

, v

)

7→

1

1+

v

.

a

= (1

,

0

,

0).

In the usual topology

f

is continuous. In

x

7→ h

µ

i

{

x

} \

T

we have the function

7→

f

(

) not continuous at zero. So

a

is a shift special point.

Proof.

f

(0)(

v

) =

v

. Thus

h

f

(0)

i

(

h

µ

i

{

a

} \

T

) =

h

µ

i

{

a

} \

T

intersects the

plane

Z

= 0. But

f

(0

, a

)

??

Question

2435

.

Can we exclude real numbers from the play?

Question

2436

.

How cardinality special points, isomorphism special points

and shift special points are related with each others?